Risky Business

On Tuesday I sat in an investment meeting about my 401K plan at work. Our finanical advisor broke down their different investment models based upon the kind of investor you are. The kind of investor you are is largely dependent on your risk tolerance and how far you are from retirement. How much are you willing to invest, and how much of your investment do you want in high yield, high risk stock?

Amid the pie charts and colored spectrums, I began pondering a very different type of investment in the future–the emotional kind that we make in relationships. Love can be very much like a 401K plan: ideally, your contributions should be matched by someone; investing in the wrong things can cost you dearly and make your future security uncertain; you have to evaluate how your current approach is working and adjusting accordingly at intervals to ensure maximum returns and growthl even with all your research, you still don’t know everything that could possibly happen before you invest, and; at some point, in order to profit, you have to take a risk.

There are some people who really aren’t worth the investment for where we are in our lives. The risk outweighs the rewards, or they started out strong in the beginning but have since taken a turn, like the housing market. Or what returns we expect or the level of risk we want to assume has changed.

As I said before, an important factor to consider when investing is how many years you are from retirement. If we say retirement is marriage in this scenario, you can see how this affects where we will invest. This is the reason some of the people you know who used to be wild and crazy have toned it down, or why some people will stop dating a certain type after a certain point in life and are no longer willing to “see where it goes.” The are being less risky in order to decrease the possibility of losses and retire well.

But what kind of investment are you? We can so often take stock of others’ strengths and weaknesses well, but what about our own? What kind of investor is attracted to us? Do we want that type of investor?

I think I’ve almost always been a moderate conservative to moderate investment; there’s very litte risk associated with me. People who thrive on the excitement of “will we break up today?” or “Will she try and stab me again or cut my tires?” are not attracted to me. I don’t break up to make up. I am not investing in any more high risk individuals who will drop you from their lives over a difference of opinion. I get excitement from wondering what we will do next together, where we will vacation/visit, the children we may have, where we’ll live.

I have some things about me that are in a fixed account, with guaranteed security and nominal gains ( my Christianity/spirituality, loyalty, work ethic, capacity to love & forgive), parts that are safe bets (my cooking and housekeeping skills), and risky ventures, subject to change over time in unstable markets (my weight, my career, self-esteem).

Sometimes, in some ways, I wish I was a high risk stock that you can’t pass up. Like if I was ridiculously good looking. I could be crazy or lazy or dumb as a box of rocks–someone would want and appreciate me. A LOT of someones. I mostly get looked over or settled for. Men get close to their “sowing wild oats retirement” and then they want to look for women like me to settle down with. Meanwhile I fell like I’ve been settled my entire life, slowly but steadily growing into the person I am now. So sometime soon, there will be a surplus of men wanting to date me, lol. Hopefully, it won’t matter to me, as I won’t be on the market. *Hopefully.* I’m not much for dating. It’s like going on a million job interviews, getting hunderds of call backs, never knowing when the last interview is and you’ll get the job. No. Thank. You.

So what kind of investment are you? What type of people do you invest in? How do you protect your relatinship investments? What rules do you follow when choosing portfolio’s or investment plans? How good are you at the love stock market?

3 Comments

  1. I absolutely love the analogy of your love life to the stock market – very clever.

    I’m with you on the dating being like a job interview. Ick. Please don’t ‘settle’ – you deserve a man that adores you and sees the value of his investment in you. (Okay, so the 401K analogy doesn’t work as well for me as it does for you).

    • 2blu2btru

      I completely agree with you and do not intend to settle! Settling is for people not willing to ride out the ups and downs of the market. They get jittery and place all their stock in a fund that seems safe but either isn’t safe or has returns far below what you should accept.

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